EMail Print

Eventlist

Event 

An Invention More Important than Democracy: Aeschylus’ Eumenides
Title:
An Invention More Important than Democracy: Aeschylus’ Eumenides
When:
21.08.2014 19.00 h
Where:
The Ithacan Philanthropic Society - Melbourne
Category:
Education

Description

Presenter: Dimitris Vardoulakis
Entry: Free

Synopsis

It is often said that the Athenians invented democracy. However, it is well known that voting was widely practiced in various communities throughout antiquity.

I will contend that the Athenians invented something much more important than voting, namely, the distinction between a politics of kinship and a politics of judgment.

The clearest example of this Athenian preoccupation is the trial of Orestes in the Eumenides.

Has Orestes killed his mother and thus is to be tried under the laws of patricide? Or has he disposed of a tyrant thereby liberating his polis?

The Athenians were called to solve this conundrum and their response set the stage for how we think the political even today.


Biography

Dimitris Vardoulakis is the chair of the Philosophy Research Initiative at the University of Western Sydney. His books include The Doppelgänger (2010), Sovereignty and its Other (2013), Freedom from the Free Will: Kafka as Political Philosopher (forthcoming), and Stasis: On Agonistic Democracy (forthcoming).


Sponsors

We would like to thank Manos Tzimpragos for sponsoring tonight’s lecture. Such initiatives assist us in providing these lectures free to the public. If you would like to participate as a sponsor from as little as $100 please send us an email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

We would also like to thank our corporate sponsor:

twe mono black opt

Venue

Venue:
The Ithacan Philanthropic Society   -   Website
Street:
Level 2, 329 Elizabeth Street
Postcode:
3000
Suburb:
Melbourne
State:
VIC
Country:
Country: au

In October 1916, the Ithacan migrants of Melbourne established the ITHACAN PHILANTHROPIC SOCIETY "The Ulysses", with an inaugural membership of some 153 members. This was in response to pleas for aid from their loved ones in Ithaca who were suffering deprivation during the First World War.

Over the years, however, the Society has been much more than just a philanthropic institution. It has been a constant in the lives of the early Ithacan migrants replacing the homeland which they had left.

The Society takes an active role in the cultural, social, educational and quality of life interests of the Ithacan Community. The Society, as part of its philanthropic role, also makes many monetary contributions to worthy causes, including those outside the immediate Ithacan community. The Society celebrated its 90th Anniversary in 2006.

Alphington Grammar Koinotika Nea - the Greek Community newsletter Requirements for Greek Citizenship

 

Advertisement
Banner
Advertisement